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Trinh et al. v. Toronto Standard Condominium Corporations No. 2745 - 2023 ONCAT 64 - 2023-05-02

Corporation:

TTSCC 2745

Date:

2023-05-02

Under:

CAT Decisions - Motion Order
Noise
Other Type of Nuisance, Annoyance or Disruption
Vibration

Summary:

In the case of Trinh et al. v. Toronto Standard Condominium Corporations No. 2745, 2023 ONCAT 64, the applicants filed an application with the Condominium Authority Tribunal (CAT) seeking resolution of a vibration nuisance issue caused by a gym located in their condominium. The Respondent in this case is Toronto Standard Condominium Corporation No. 2745 (TSCC 2745). The Respondent filed a motion to add seven individuals to the application and to dismiss the application for lack of jurisdiction. The Applicants did not submit further information regarding the addition of individuals. The CAT's decision, under Rule 4 of the CAT's Rules of Practice, was not to add the seven individuals to the application, as their inclusion would not be the most expeditious method to address the noise problems. The issue of dismissing the application was reserved for later in the mediation process.

Verdict:

Quick Verdict/Lesson:
In the case of Trinh et al. v. Toronto Standard Condominium Corporations No. 2745 (2023 ONCAT 64), the Condominium Authority Tribunal (CAT) rejected a motion by the Respondent to add seven individuals to the application. The dispute focused on noise and vibration caused by a shared element (the gym) that was the responsibility of the condominium corporation. The CAT emphasized that adding individuals would not be the most expeditious method to address the noise issue, as it was a shared element problem, and dismissed the motion to add these individuals. The issue of jurisdiction was reserved for later in the mediation process.




Takeaways:

Key takeaways from the case of Trinh et al. v. Toronto Standard Condominium Corporations No. 2745 (2023 ONCAT 64) include:

Jurisdiction for Condominium Disputes: The Condominium Authority Tribunal (CAT) has jurisdiction over condominium disputes, including those related to noise and vibration, as established in Ontario Regulations and the Condominium Act, 1998.

Adding or Removing Parties: The CAT has the authority to add or remove parties from a case if it considers it appropriate. In this case, the applicants sought to address issues related to noise and vibration from a gym within their condominium complex, naming the condominium corporation (TSCC 2745) as the respondent.

Focus on the Issue, Not Individuals: The case emphasized that the dispute was about resolving noise and vibration issues associated with the gym, rather than identifying individual residents responsible for the noise. The CAT noted that the most expeditious method for addressing this issue was by focusing on the condominium corporation as the respondent.

Expectation of Addressing Noise Issues: The CAT considered the applicants' expectation that their noise and vibration complaints would be addressed by the condominium corporation since it was responsible for managing shared elements, such as the gym, on behalf of all unit owners.

Resolution of Dispute: The CAT reserved the decision on the issue of dismissing the application, allowing the mediation process to proceed before making a final determination.

This case highlights the importance of effectively addressing shared element-related disputes within condominiums and emphasizes the CAT's role in ensuring that issues are resolved in an expeditious manner.

Recommendations: 

Prompt Dispute Resolution: Condominium authorities and residents should aim for prompt dispute resolution. In this case, the dispute was related to noise and vibration from a shared element (the gym), which affected multiple residents. It is important to address such disputes efficiently to maintain a peaceful living environment. Encourage the use of established dispute resolution mechanisms like the Condominium Authority Tribunal.

Clearly Define Parties: When dealing with disputes, it's essential to clearly define the parties involved. The tribunal ruled against adding seven individuals to the application, emphasizing that the most expeditious method of resolving the dispute was to deal directly with the condominium corporation. Ensure that parties directly responsible for common elements are held accountable for addressing issues that affect multiple residents.

Record and Report Noise Disturbances: Residents should follow established procedures for reporting and addressing noise disturbances. In this case, the tribunal mentioned that the applicants were instructed to report noise disturbances to security for investigation. Encourage residents to follow such procedures and cooperate with the condominium management in resolving noise-related issues.

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